Steamy in My Kitchen Today

It is steamy in my kitchen today.  Not because of the weather, but because of the bevy of activity on the stove.  Today is a day of preserving and I’m up to my elbows in blackberries and cucumbers.


Blackberries

Yesterday, in the torrential downpour, Jeff picked a boat-load (yes, that’s an official measurement) of blackberries.  So today I had to honor his commitment to his garden by making something wonderful from the harvest.  I was going to make blackberry jam, but why do that when you can mix it up?  Jeff and I both had similar trains of thought for the blackberries. The thought  processes went something like this……

“Jam…..ok……but better……add herbs…..ok……..what kind…….basil? No……..thyme? Maybe…….rosemary?  Definitely…..but better……add a
dash of balsamic? Ahhhhhhhh.”

Having taken a ride on that thought train, today’s jam is Blackberry Balsamic Jam with Rosemary and it sure smells good in my kitchen!!!! The jam is made and has been passed through the food mill.  The jars are sterilizing on the stove top as I write.  All that is left is to fill them and give them private time to relax in a water bath.

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Just in case you’re wondering about jam vs. jelly vs. marmalade……..

What else is going on in the kitchen?  Bread and butter pickles.

I am not a lover of cucumbers.  In fact, I would almost rather starve than eat one; however I love cucumber spa water and I love bread and butter pickles.  So when my mother-in-law asked if I wanted some fresh cucumbers from her garden, I accepted with the intention of turning them into pickles.

[OK, I must confess – I took a quick break from writing to get the jam into the jars and the jars into the canner.  Now I can get back to writing about the pickles.]

Having never made bread and butter pickles, Jeff’s mom generously shared her recipe with me via Jeff’s phone.  However, I forgot to get the recipe from him and he is currently unreachable by phone so I did a google search for ‘bread and butter pickles.’  The search pointed me to Pinterest (darn), which yielded a recipe from the Brown Eyed Baker that sounded good to me.

The Brown Eyed Baker’s recipe for bread and butter pickles is currently in process in my kitchen.  I waffle cut the cucumbers using my mandoline (Q: Have I ever mentioned how much I love my mandoline? A: Only about a million times!) (Q: Have I ever mentioned the importance of safety when using a mandoline? A: Mentioned is too subtle a word for what I’ve done – ranted is more like it. If you want to read about it, click See John Cook: A Public Safety Message & Rant).

Now the cucumbers, having been salted according to the recipe, are chillin’ in the fridge.  As soon as the jam comes out of the canner, I will be on to the next step of the recipe. Stay tuned…..

B&BPickles

[Insert your favorite elevator music here!!!]

Ok, I’m back…..While I waited for the jam to finish, I:  Pickling Solution

 

  • soaked my plastic cutting boards in a bleach and water solution,
  • emptied and reloaded the dishwasher,
  • listened to my belly growl,
  • started a pot of cold brew coffee
  • rinsed the cucumbers according to the recipe instructions
  • thinly sliced the onions
  • prepared the pickling solution

 

Cucumbers & Onions in Pickling SolutionThen, while the cucumbers sat in the hot pickling solution, I:

 

  • made a quick trip to the grocery store
  • watered my plants
  • dusted the living room
  • swept the kitchen floor
  • baked some sweet potatoes for lunches this week
  • returned some phone calls
  • fed my growling belly

 

Finally, I packed the jars and put them in the canner for 10 minutes.

It was certainly a productive day, not just in my steamy kitchen; but at my house in general.  I’ll be happy in the months to come when I open a jar of jam or a jar of pickles.  And I’ll have some healthy lunches this week too.  So here’s to steamy!

All in a Days Work

 

 

 

 

 

Just Peachy

Last week in the Outer Banks was terrific.  I truly can’t remember the last time I was so relaxed.  We let each day unfold like a surprise.  We had no plan, no itinerary, and no stress!

On our way home, just before we crossed from North Carolina into Virginia, we stopped at a roadside produce stand to pick up some late-summer peaches.  And boy are they good!  Jeff and I usually overdose on PA peaches in August; but this summer we just didn’t find any great peaches near home.  Fortunately, North Carolina not only delivered on a great vacation, but on great produce as well.

As a salute to vacation, I decided to bake today; which is funny since our fridge is bare. After scanning the contents, I decided to make a crostata – a rustic Italian tart.  But I wanted to amp it up a little so I added some brandy to the last of the blackberry syrup Jeff used to make a refreshing blackberry gin drink on vacation and I added a little bit of fresh thyme from the garden.

I used the 3/4 cup of blackberry syrup that remained and added to it 6 Tbsp of brandy and 1 Tbsp of chopped fresh thyme.  I cooked it over medium low heat for 15 minutes, whisking frequently, until it reduced and became dark and thick.

While the syrup reduced, I made the dough.  This dough is a very simple recipe with just a few ingredients:

I pulsed the flour, salt, sugar, lemon zest and thyme in a food processor until just combined and then added the cold butter.  I pulsed the food processor until the butter incorporated into the flour mixture and resembled coarse crumbs.  I added the ice water a bit at a time until the dough began to hold together.

Then I turned the dough out onto a board, gathered it together, shaped it into a ball, flattened the ball into a disk, wrapped it in plastic wrap and refrigerated it for approximately 1 hour.

I rolled the cold dough into a rough 12-inch “circle” – remember this is a RUSTIC Italian tart –  and transferred it onto a parchment lined baking sheet.

I then topped the dough with the blackberry, brandy, and thyme reduction – kind of like you top a pizza crust with sauce.

I sliced two ripe, juicy peaches and arranged them on the crostata.  I folded the edges of the crostata toward the center – no need to be precise.  In my opinion, the more rustic looking, the better.

I brushed the crust with egg wash and sprinkled it with some white (I’m not quite sure why they call it white when it is really clear) sanding sugar and baked the crostata in a 400 degree oven for approximately 35 minutes.

The end result is a delightfully mouth-watering treat.

I rewarded myself with a piece of the crostata dusted lightly with powdered sugar and a steaming cup of Jeff’s yummy coffee.  I’d say my day is going to be just peachy!