Recipe Review: Roasted Mushroom Soup with Apple Cider Stock Part I

If you love mushrooms, this is a very interesting twist on mushroom soup.  If you love apple cider, this is a very unusual use for it.  Now what I write next is difficult for a blogger to pen; but if the thought of spending 10 to 12 hours on PART of a soup petrifies or perplexes you, you may want to stop reading.  Of course, you may just want to read for the entertainment value!!!

This is a soup I’ve been wanting to make for years and haven’t taken the time to tackle.  But the class I am teaching tomorrow evening at the Kitchen Shoppe – Apple Harvest – is all about apples and was the perfect reason to try this recipe.  As I do with all my class recipes, I made several iterations.  The last time I made it, I took pictures to share with you.

Since the soup is really a two-part recipe – the stock and then the soup – I thought I’d write the post that way as well.  So what I’m writing about here is just the apple cider stock, which could be used in other applications – I think an autumn risotto with this stock would be fantastic, perhaps with some roasted butternut squash to keep it veg or if you’re not concerned with meatless meals you might consider adding sausage…..mmm mmm mmm.

Anyway….

The following is a mostly pictorial representation of the stock-making process.  I should mention that I made a double batch, so don’t be alarmed if quantities of the ingredients in the recipe below do not match the quantities in the photos!

1. Preheat oven to 300 Degrees F

1. Preheat oven to 300 Degrees F

 

2. Washed Apples & Carrots

2. Washed Apples & Carrots

I cored the apples and cut them into wedges and then cut the wedges in half.  I peeled the carrots and cut them into 2″ lengths.

3. Leeks Before Cutting

3. Leeks Before Cutting

Leeks are VERY, VERY, VERY sandy, so they must be well cleaned.  I started by rinsing the outside.

4. Remove Root and Dark Green End

4. Remove Root and Dark Green End

Then I cut off the root end and the dark green tops.

5. Leeks Halved Lengthwise

5. Leeks Halved Lengthwise

I sliced each one in half lengthwise.

6. Leeks Cut into 2" Pieces

6. Leeks Cut into 2″ Pieces

And then I cut the halves into 2″ pieces.

7. Separated Layers in Water to Rinse Sand

7. Separated Layers in Water to Rinse Sand

I separated the cut layers and put them into a large bowl of cold water and “swished” them around – yes, “swish” is a technical cooking term!

8. Change Water Frequently - It Will Get Quite Dirty

8. Change Water Frequently – It Will Get Quite Dirty

Because I was cleaning quite a few leeks, I changed the water frequently.  As you can see, it gets quite dirty and it’s hard to clean anything with dirty water.

9. Leeks Draining

9. Leeks Draining

After swishing the leeks in the bowl of water, I removed them to a colander and rinsed them.

10. Leeks Drying

10. Leeks Drying

After all the leeks were “swished” and rinsed and drained in the colander, I moved them to a towel to dry.

11. Cut Portobello Mushrooms

11. Cut Portobello Mushrooms

I know the recipe calls for Portobello mushroom stems, but I wasn’t able to get stems only so I used the caps too!

12a. Veggies Roasting in Oven

12a. Veggies Roasting in Oven

After all the veggies were cleaned and cut, I put them on several half sheet pans, tossed them with peanut oil and sprinkled them with the coriander seeds.

12b. Veggies Roasting in Oven

12b. Veggies Roasting in Oven

Then I slid the trays into the oven to begin the 2-hour roast.  I turned the veggies and rotated the trays every 30 minutes.

13a.  Veggies After 1 Hour of Raosting

13a. Veggies After 1 Hour of Roasting

13b.  Veggies After 1 Hours of Raosting

13b. Veggies After 1 Hours of Roasting

The veggies and apples were beginning to caramelize after 1 hour.

14. Veggies After 2 Hours of Roasting

14. Veggies After 2 Hours of Roasting

After 2 hours, the veggies looked wonderful!  I scraped them into a stock pot and used some of the cider to scrape the browned bits from the bottom of the roasting pans.

15. Roasted Veggies, Cider, Spices and Herbs

15. Roasted Veggies, Cider, Spices and Herbs

I added the apple cider, the peppercorns, some bay leaves and the fresh Italian parsley and put it on the stove to simmer….and simmer….and simmer.

16. Stock After Simmering for 8 Hours

16. Stock After Simmering for 8 Hours

After simmering for 8 hours, the stock looked rich and delicious.

17. Veggies to Discard After Straining

17. Veggies to Discard After Straining

I strained the stock and discarded the veggies and apples….

18. Spices to Discard After Straining

18. Spices to Discard After Straining

…and the herbs and spices.

19. The Finished Product

19. The Finished Product

20. The Finished Product

20. The Finished Product

Then I put the stock into the refrigerator and went to bed!!!!

I KNOW that I am asking you to devote a LOT of time to this recipe; but it’s a labor of love….perhaps it’s a recipe you would consider for a holiday.  I will suggest that although there are a lot of hours involved in making the stock – there is a lot of “down time” while the veggies are roasting and the stock is simmering.  You could make this on a fall Saturday while you’re watching football!  Your house will smell AMAZING!

You’ll have to stay tuned for my rating of this recipe…..

 

Apple Cider Stock

Ingredients

  • 4 cooking apples (such as Fuji, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Cortland, or Nittany)
  • 6 medium carrots
  • 6 leeks (roots and 1/2 of greens leaves removed)
  • 4 cups Portobello mushroom stems
  • 3 tablespoons light cooking oil (such as safflower or peanut oil)
  • 2 tablespoons coriander seeds
  • 1 gallon fresh apple cider
  • 2 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 12 sprigs fresh Italian parsley
  • 1 bay leaf

Note

Adapted from "In Praise of Apples: A Harvest of History, Horticulture & Recipes" by Mark Rosenstein, 1996.

This recipe will make more cider stock than you need for the Roasted Mushroom Soup with Apple Cider Stock.  YOu can freeze the rest for other uses.

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F.
2. Core and chop the unpeeled apples.
3. Cut the peeled carrots, leeks and mushroom stems into 2" pieces (discard any hard ends of the mushroom stems).
4. Place the chopped veggies and apples on sheet pans, toss with the cooking oil, and add the whole coriander seeds.
5. Roast until veggies and apples are golden brown, about 2 hours, turning the ingredients approximately every 30 minutes to ensure even browning.
6. Scrape the roasted vegetables into a stockpot. To loosen the browned bits stuck to the bottom of the roasting pan, pour in 1/2 to 1 cup of cold water and scrape the bottom with a wooden spoon (this process is known as deglazing).
7. Add the cider, the remaining stock ingredients, and just enough cold water to cover the vegetables. Place the lid on the stockpot, leaving it slightly ajar, and heat the stock over medium-low heat. It should reach a simmer in approximately 1 hour. Simmer for 8 hours, adjusting the heat if necessary.
8. Strain, cool and refrigerate.

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